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How Going Solar Transformed the Life of Stanford Njuguna

How Going Solar Transformed the Life of Stanford Njuguna

How Going Solar Transformed the Life of Stanford Njuguna  

Here’s a sad truth - 43% of Kenyans are still living in the dark. But more than a threat to security and economy, this lack of electricity results in a more serious problem that is often overlooked. The potential of millions of African children is being stunted by the absence of a reliable light source. Children can’t study at night. Homemade kerosene lamps may be available but it’s fairly expensive and extremely hazardous.

Offset Solar partnered with Solar-Aid to deliver reliable solar lights into African remote communities and educate people about their benefits. So far, the project has helped over 38,000 people and saved communities almost $2 million in fuel. More importantly, these solar lights gave students and children the chance to extend their study time at night.

18-year-old Stanford Njuguna is living proof that solar can transform the lives of urban communities for the better. It was 2011 when Stanford, his mother and two siblings were evicted from their home due to some ethnic clashes. The family relocated to Kinangop, a constituency in Kenya. Several months after moving, they worried over Stanford’s education and whether or not he would be able to finish school.

In 2012, lady luck knocked on their door. Thanks to a good Samaritan, Stanford and his family were given an acre of land so they can grow their own food. They also received two solar lights through the charitable partnership of Offset Solar and Solar-Aid. It not only provided them reliable light but also a safer alternative to kerosene lamps, which present a serious health hazard.

Stanford successfully finished high school by 2017. He’s an achiever, especially in his favorite subject—math. Out of 615,773 candidates who sat for the national exam, the solar champion from Kinangop is one of only 17,000 (2.76%) who will attend public universities in October 2018. He attributes his academic success to their home solar lights. While in high school, he sold solar lights during holidays as a way to offset school fees. But more than anything, he also did it to support his sister and brother.

Knowing how a clean light source can transform the lives of many others like him, Stanford continued the advocacy. The Solar for Peace Initiative has taken him to 28 out of the 47 counties in Kenya. He uses these travelling opportunities to promote the benefits of solar. He rallies communities to become part of the answer to the challenges brought about by the lack of access to electricity. When he has spare time during his visits, Stanford provides free math coaching to students who need it.

Solar lamps may not be enough to answer Kenya’s power problem, but they are the only clean and affordable light source available right now. These little lamps can provide families with hours of much-needed light in the evening. By going solar, Stanford not only changed his life, but also became a positive influence to the lives of others.

  Interested in a Free Sun Analysis?
    Request a sun analysis to get a true cost quote.

How Going Solar Transformed the Life of Stanford Njuguna

Kenya's 18 Year Old Solar Champion

Here’s a sad truth - 43% of Kenyans are still living in the dark. But more than a threat to security and economy, this lack of electricity results in a more serious problem that is often overlooked. The potential of millions of African children is being stunted by the absence of a reliable light source. Children can’t study at night. Homemade kerosene lamps may be available but it’s fairly expensive and extremely hazardous.

Offset Solar partnered with Solar-Aid to deliver reliable solar lights into African remote communities and educate people about their benefits. So far, the project has helped over 38,000 people and saved communities almost $2 million in fuel. More importantly, these solar lights gave students and children the chance to extend their study time at night.

18-year-old Stanford Njuguna is living proof that solar can transform the lives of urban communities for the better. It was 2011 when Stanford, his mother and two siblings were evicted from their home due to some ethnic clashes. The family relocated to Kinangop, a constituency in Kenya. Several months after moving, they worried over Stanford’s education and whether or not he would be able to finish school.

In 2012, lady luck knocked on their door. Thanks to a good Samaritan, Stanford and his family were given an acre of land so they can grow their own food. They also received two solar lights through the charitable partnership of Offset Solar and Solar-Aid. It not only provided them reliable light but also a safer alternative to kerosene lamps, which present a serious health hazard.

Stanford successfully finished high school by 2017. He’s an achiever, especially in his favorite subject—math. Out of 615,773 candidates who sat for the national exam, the solar champion from Kinangop is one of only 17,000 (2.76%) who will attend public universities in October 2018. He attributes his academic success to their home solar lights. While in high school, he sold solar lights during holidays as a way to offset school fees. But more than anything, he also did it to support his sister and brother.

Knowing how a clean light source can transform the lives of many others like him, Stanford continued the advocacy. The Solar for Peace Initiative has taken him to 28 out of the 47 counties in Kenya. He uses these travelling opportunities to promote the benefits of solar. He rallies communities to become part of the answer to the challenges brought about by the lack of access to electricity. When he has spare time during his visits, Stanford provides free math coaching to students who need it.

Solar lamps may not be enough to answer Kenya’s power problem, but they are the only clean and affordable light source available right now. These little lamps can provide families with hours of much-needed light in the evening. By going solar, Stanford not only changed his life, but also became a positive influence to the lives of others.

  Interested in a Free Sun Analysis?
    Request a sun analysis to get a true cost quote for your home.

Here’s a sad truth - 43% of Kenyans are still living in the dark. But more than a threat to security and economy, this lack of electricity results in a more serious problem that is often overlooked. The potential of millions of African children is being stunted by the absence of a reliable light source. Children can’t study at night. Homemade kerosene lamps may be available but it’s fairly expensive and extremely hazardous.

Offset Solar partnered with Solar-Aid to deliver reliable solar lights into African remote communities and educate people about their benefits. So far, the project has helped over 38,000 people and saved communities almost $2 million in fuel. More importantly, these solar lights gave students and children the chance to extend their study time at night.

18-year-old Stanford Njuguna is living proof that solar can transform the lives of urban communities for the better. It was 2011 when Stanford, his mother and two siblings were evicted from their home due to some ethnic clashes. The family relocated to Kinangop, a constituency in Kenya. Several months after moving, they worried over Stanford’s education and whether or not he would be able to finish school.

In 2012, lady luck knocked on their door. Thanks to a good Samaritan, Stanford and his family were given an acre of land so they can grow their own food. They also received two solar lights through the charitable partnership of Offset Solar and Solar-Aid. It not only provided them reliable light but also a safer alternative to kerosene lamps, which present a serious health hazard.

Stanford successfully finished high school by 2017. He’s an achiever, especially in his favorite subject—math. Out of 615,773 candidates who sat for the national exam, the solar champion from Kinangop is one of only 17,000 (2.76%) who will attend public universities in October 2018. He attributes his academic success to their home solar lights. While in high school, he sold solar lights during holidays as a way to offset school fees. But more than anything, he also did it to support his sister and brother.

Knowing how a clean light source can transform the lives of many others like him, Stanford continued the advocacy. The Solar for Peace Initiative has taken him to 28 out of the 47 counties in Kenya. He uses these travelling opportunities to promote the benefits of solar. He rallies communities to become part of the answer to the challenges brought about by the lack of access to electricity. When he has spare time during his visits, Stanford provides free math coaching to students who need it.

Solar lamps may not be enough to answer Kenya’s power problem, but they are the only clean and affordable light source available right now. These little lamps can provide families with hours of much-needed light in the evening. By going solar, Stanford not only changed his life, but also became a positive influence to the lives of others.

Interested in a Free Sun Analysis?  
Request a sun analysis to get a true cost quote for your home.